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The rate of oxidation of trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA) and formation of a precipitate of cyanuric acid

In 1997, Hiegel and Chaharmohal developed a new method for the differentiation of primary and secondary alcohols based on the rate of oxidation of trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA) and formation of a precipitate of cyanuric acid. 
According to the authors, secondary alcohols react faster than primary alcohols with trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA) in acid solution of acetonitrile. In this study, a spot test for distinguishing alcohols was developed based on the oxidation reaction of alcohols by tribromoisocyanuric acid (TBCA) . This reagent is an easily handled white solid that can be safely prepared from isocyanuric acid.
This is somewhat expected, since electron-rich groups such as amines and thiols, can reduce almost instantaneously both TBCA and Trichloroisocyanuric Acid (TCCA) exothermically, affording isocyanuric acid (responsible for the turbidity) in an exothermic reaction, which cause some smoking/gas evolution in the test tube. These effects can therefore interfere in the tests. Ethers and ketones in excess (1 mL) also interfere with the test. However, smaller proportions of these functions may be present without generating false positive results.
Study the Trichloroisocyanuric Acid (TCCA) solution (Lang cable disinfectants) oral model material for the hepatitis B virus disinfection effect. Methods: hepatitis B e antigen-positive serum samples stamp pollution from the standard model made of water (A group) and containing different chlorine concentration (group B 2 000 mg / L, group C 3 000 mg / L) as a disinfectant Lang cable solvent plaster model irrigation system, after release from the plaster model, samples for virus detection.